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jinxtigr
05-03-2008, 01:06 AM
Always nice to have a more ambitious project out on the horizon, so here's the question- does anybody know anything about cams that can be used on a 3300 engine? Not the 60 degree V6 3100/3400, but a 3300?

In a more general sense, I notice the more aggressive camshafts seem to be about delivering higher power at high RPMs, and you can end up with a very nasty, irregular idle.

I actually like the idle issue- like a dragster in other words, fierce- but my general question is, if you are using an aggressive cam and the idle is suffering, are you LOSING low-RPM power relative to a normal cam, or are you gaining some power there too and it's just about whether the engine wants to stall on you?

I'm picturing Fluffy looking very innocent and sounding very, very guilty...

jinxtigr
05-03-2008, 01:38 AM
Actually, Google is answering some of my questions- namely, going to a really aggressive cam so idle suffers will also hurt low-end power. It's moving a power band up and down in the RPM range, and the aggressive cams are moving the RPM up, where I won't be using it.

I'm looking into timing and finding similar things about that- advancing timing can push power lower in the RPM range and retarding it can move the power higher. Sometimes factory timing is a bit advanced to make up for expected timing chain wear. Apparently 3300 and 3800 have a timing chain tensioner making this a nonissue?

It also looks like a general thing that cams shifting power up into higher RPMs also take a toll on fuel economy, which has me wondering. It would be nice if I could not sacrifice that, but perhaps with cams it's just impossible. In particular it's a drag that the fierce, dragster style cams are pigs for fuel economy and low-end torque.

Buick_powa
05-03-2008, 04:28 AM
Crower make cams for GM 90degrees V6 from 200 to 229 CID 5 stages a available and seems to be quite cheap i bought one from them a stage 3 power rang from 1500 to 4500 that sure 3300 engine have theyre power near 5200 rpm but really start to put some power near 3000 rpm up to 6000 rpm that cam is NOT performance created yes idle suffer but high end power is simply sick! thats not just a smoot acceleration from idle to 3000 rpm it's brute force from 1500 rpm and goes up to 6000 rpm

LordDurock
05-03-2008, 05:18 AM
jinstigy. you looking to do a turbo mod right? sit and think about this your going to get hte most power higher up, with low comp raito pistion you lower end has suffered yes. but at hte same time you need to tune for high end power to get the most out of your turbo. or you need to cut back on you boost/ raise comratio. to run in a lower rmp band. just my thoughts. look in to water injection.

jinxtigr
05-03-2008, 07:32 PM
No, I'm not so sure about a turbo mod. Possible, maybe even a good idea but there's also the rather pricey ($1500 and up) supercharger-where-the-AC-compressor-was mod, and fundamental stuff like cams. The thing is if I'm going to do anything like that it's going to be either:

-the guy I know at Advance who likes these engines and knows about the supercharger mod, or

-the mechanic I use locally who is extremely honest but doesn't think I need to be fooling with stuff like this for a car that he doesn't think deserves it.

Obviously I disagree, but at the same time there's no way I'm turning the engine into a race engine, because I don't race. Whatever I do has to either help or not hurt highway cruise which with the overdrive is VERY low RPM. Some of my routes are about 45 mph roads and the overdrive can barely stay engaged at such a low speed.

Brute force from 1500 rpm sounds like it wouldn't hurt- I gotta admit, 'high end power is simply sick!' makes my ears perk up bigtime even though there's a risk of never using that performance and having the existing MPG suffer (hopefully not bigtime). I don't mind dodgy idle at all, I just don't want to kill the fuel efficiency in normal driving, which is why I think a crazy cam would be bad.

Turbo would at least give me an efficiency boost for boring driving too, don't know if I could install it myself though I'm reasonably good with ducts. I have never pulled this engine, or any engine, and don't even know how to take the top end (fuel rails, injectors etc) off, though I'm surely going to learn eventually.

What I'm looking to do- who knows, maybe over this summer? is to boost the power, not kill fuel economy for daily driving, possibly toughen the engine (I know the rods are very tough already in a 3300) and possibly make the SOUND of the engine much crazier, which probably goes along with top-end power.

So, I'd like to know specifically what you look at in cams to know it's a GM 90degree V6- '200 to 229 CID' has to do with tuning of the cam, not which engine it goes in? Or does that describe which engine it fits? Regardless it sounds a lot like you're describing a cam that throws a lot more power throughout the powerband over the stock cam, I'd like to know which part number it was.

I'm also looking at an interesting 'while you're in there' type thing- replacement of the timing chain (which is probably good though it has high miles on it) with gears. I don't know if such a thing will go into a 3300 engine though it looks plausible- also, I'm concerned that some of the gear sets, designed for a wild noisy 'blower whine' sound, say you cannot use them on cars with knock sensors. I think the 3300 has a knock sensor along with all its other many sensors. Timing gears probably aren't going to give any power at all, they would just be there to be more reliable in the long haul, and to give the engine sound a really startling overtone that's meant to be there. (you can also get not-noisy gears)

Buick_powa
05-04-2008, 04:27 AM
So, I'd like to know specifically what you look at in cams to know it's a GM 90degree V6- '200 to 229 CID' has to do with tuning of the cam, not which engine it goes in? Or does that describe which engine it fits? Regardless it sounds a lot like you're describing a cam that throws a lot more power throughout the powerband over the stock cam, I'd like to know which part number it was.

I'm also looking at an interesting 'while you're in there' type thing- replacement of the timing chain (which is probably good though it has high miles on it) with gears. I don't know if such a thing will go into a 3300 engine though it looks plausible- also, I'm concerned that some of the gear sets, designed for a wild noisy 'blower whine' sound, say you cannot use them on cars with knock sensors. I think the 3300 has a knock sensor along with all its other many sensors. Timing gears probably aren't going to give any power at all, they would just be there to be more reliable in the long haul, and to give the engine sound a really startling overtone that's meant to be there. (you can also get not-noisy gears)

If you buy your cam from a renown company like crower,comp cam,etc they will identify the cam to the engine series where it is used. I bought a Crower cam part #03115 - CHEVY 200-229 90 DEG V6 BAJA BEAST HYDRAULIC CAM

as you know 3300 engine are chevy engines used in a bunch of other companies so.

yeah as your there you can inspect timing gears wear as well as timing chain, changing cam seal, cam bearing if needed, check for lifters and rockers too, bent pushrods, everything that connect to the valve train

skalor
05-04-2008, 05:23 AM
as you know 3300 engine are chevy engines used in a bunch of other companies so.

The 3300 is a Buick derivative engine along with the 3800.

Buick_powa
05-04-2008, 05:40 AM
The 3300 is a Buick derivative engine along with the 3800.

I think i already said that... by the way taht for the precisions

jinxtigr
05-04-2008, 03:50 PM
I'm gonna ask a super dumb question so I can stop being super dumb myself...

Is '90 degree V6' the only part that has to do with what engine it is, and "200-229" means how hot the cam is?

If it does relate to the engine, where does the 200 or 229 come from, what does that mean?

skalor
05-04-2008, 04:31 PM
That cam will not work for the 3300. It was designed for a chevy 90* V6 which is completely different than a Buick 90* V6. If it was meant for Buick V6 the CID would go to 231 and not just 229. I suggest if you want to find a cam that fits the 3300 that you call the big companies like Comp, Crower, and Lunati. I don't think any company currently makes a cam that will work in the 3300 but I could be wrong.

86euro
05-04-2008, 04:38 PM
as you know 3300 engine are chevy engines used in a bunch of other companies so.

That's what you said;)

Buick_powa
05-04-2008, 04:41 PM
I'm gonna ask a super dumb question so I can stop being super dumb myself...

Is '90 degree V6' the only part that has to do with what engine it is, and "200-229" means how hot the cam is?

If it does relate to the engine, where does the 200 or 229 come from, what does that mean?

200-229 CID the displacement of the engine

Buick_powa
05-04-2008, 04:42 PM
That cam will not work for the 3300. It was designed for a chevy 90* V6 which is completely different than a Buick 90* V6. If it was meant for Buick V6 the CID would go to 231 and not just 229. I suggest if you want to find a cam that fits the 3300 that you call the big companies like Comp, Crower, and Lunati. I don't think any company currently makes a cam that will work in the 3300 but I could be wrong.

3300 and 3800 engine ARE chevy engines buick only made V8 and one V6 the 3.8 from the grand national the rest come from chevy

skalor
05-04-2008, 04:48 PM
3300 and 3800 engine ARE chevy engines buick only made V8 and one V6 the 3.8 from the grand national the rest come from chevy
I'm sorry but you are wrong. The 3300 or 3800 wasn't even offered in a Chevy car until 1995 and even then it was a Series II. I suggest you do a little research before posting more misinformation.

85 Holiday
05-04-2008, 05:03 PM
I'm sorry but you are wrong. The 3300 or 3800 wasn't even offered in a Chevy car until 1995 and even then it was a Series II. I suggest you do a little research before posting more misinformation.

x2

jinxtigr
05-04-2008, 06:31 PM
Thanks guys- I'm paying close attention and now I know what a CID is ;)

If nobody makes 3300 cams obviously I won't be getting any... no prob...

Jr's3800
05-04-2008, 07:30 PM
3300 and 3800 engine ARE chevy engines buick only made V8 and one V6 the 3.8 from the grand national the rest come from chevy


No the H*** they don't....

The Buick V6's range from 3.0 to 4.1 depending on the model year.. You can't use a 90* Chevy cam in a 90* Buick V6.... They are very different engines..

And I hate to tell you, but the 3300 and the 3800 are indeed Buick V6 engines not Chevy..

The Chevy FWD V6's were all 60* V6's and range from 2.8 to 3.9 and the designs for them vary depending on year

Now, lets look closer at the 3300 and 3800... They are very close in design, and I am not sure what the differences are in the stock cams and can't tell you if the cams will swap over.. In later years the 3300 iirc use the 3800 heads.. From what I understand the head are swappable for the early years as well..

As far as I know, no one makes a cam for the Vin C 3800 or the Vin N 3300... There are some companies out there in Aussie land that make a Cam for the Vin L 3800, But it may or not be usable for the 3300..

On another note, the 3300 has a 5500 red line and the 3800 has a 5200 red line.... Neither of these engines on the stock cam are making much power at the top... Both of these are making their peak HP below 4800 Rpms and are making good strong low end torque from idle on up...

The 3.0 HO Vin L, 3.3( 3300 ), 3.8 Vin B, 3.8 Vin C( 3800 ), 3.8HO Vin L( 3800 Tuned Port ), 3.8 Vin 1 SC( 3800 series I supercharged ), 3.8HO Vin K ( 3800 Series II ), 3.8 Vin 1( 3800 Series II SC ).... and then you have the L26 and L32 Series III 3800 engines... Every engine listed is a Buick Engine...

Also before I forget... You CAN NOT use a Series II or III cam in the Buick 3300 or any series I 3800


Now with all of that being said you may possibly be able to get a set of 1.7 or 1.8 rockers for the 3300... You'll have to do your research there.. But if its possible for you to use a 1.8 rocker you could then bump you stock lift from .400 at the valve to about .480

CieraSL92
05-04-2008, 08:58 PM
The 3300 wasn't avaliable after 1993. FYI.

Jr's3800
05-04-2008, 09:07 PM
The 3300 wasn't avaliable after 1993. FYI.

Yes any Applications that used the 3300 Buick V6 was replaced in 1994 with the 3100 Chevrolet V6

Buick_powa
05-05-2008, 03:05 AM
ok anyway if the cam does not work with my engine my lost will only be 45$ not a big deal for me and btw crower might call them chevy v6 but it might be buick v6... we'll not past the night on that.,.. if this cam fit at the place of my stock one it will be great...

and give a look a this:

http://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc164/Buick_powa/wwwcrowercom-pdf-2008-7-66.jpg

86euro
05-05-2008, 04:51 AM
ok anyway if the cam does not work with my engine my lost will only be 45$ not a big deal for me and btw crower might call them chevy v6 but it might be buick v6... we'll not past the night on that.,.. if this cam fit at the place of my stock one it will be great...

and give a look a this:

http://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc164/Buick_powa/wwwcrowercom-pdf-2008-7-66.jpg

Those are for the Chevy 90* that's based off the good 'ol SBC, not for the Buick 90* V6. Looks like you're out $45.

Buick_powa
05-05-2008, 05:17 AM
Those are for the Chevy 90* that's based off the good 'ol SBC, not for the Buick 90* V6. Looks like you're out $45.

well.. we'll see that when i got it installed.. or not?

dcjredline
05-05-2008, 02:04 PM
No the H*** they don't....

The Buick V6's range from 3.0 to 4.1 depending on the model year.. You can't use a 90* Chevy cam in a 90* Buick V6.... They are very different engines..

And I hate to tell you, but the 3300 and the 3800 are indeed Buick V6 engines not Chevy..

The Chevy FWD V6's were all 60* V6's and range from 2.8 to 3.9 and the designs for them vary depending on year

Now, lets look closer at the 3300 and 3800... They are very close in design, and I am not sure what the differences are in the stock cams and can't tell you if the cams will swap over.. In later years the 3300 iirc use the 3800 heads.. From what I understand the head are swappable for the early years as well..

As far as I know, no one makes a cam for the Vin C 3800 or the Vin N 3300... There are some companies out there in Aussie land that make a Cam for the Vin L 3800, But it may or not be usable for the 3300..

On another note, the 3300 has a 5500 red line and the 3800 has a 5200 red line.... Neither of these engines on the stock cam are making much power at the top... Both of these are making their peak HP below 4800 Rpms and are making good strong low end torque from idle on up...

The 3.0 HO Vin L, 3.3( 3300 ), 3.8 Vin B, 3.8 Vin C( 3800 ), 3.8HO Vin L( 3800 Tuned Port ), 3.8 Vin 1 SC( 3800 series I supercharged ), 3.8HO Vin K ( 3800 Series II ), 3.8 Vin 1( 3800 Series II SC ).... and then you have the L26 and L32 Series III 3800 engines... Every engine listed is a Buick Engine...

Also before I forget... You CAN NOT use a Series II or III cam in the Buick 3300 or any series I 3800


Now with all of that being said you may possibly be able to get a set of 1.7 or 1.8 rockers for the 3300... You'll have to do your research there.. But if its possible for you to use a 1.8 rocker you could then bump you stock lift from .400 at the valve to about .480

I was about to chime in with the 3.0 in my Calais. I thought that was a Buck engine but I cant keep track of them all thats why I am here cause we have all different kinds of experts here that we can all rely on.

Jr's3800
05-05-2008, 09:59 PM
Another Small note... The 3300 V6 just like the 3800 uses a roller cam and roller lifters

Zaloryan
10-28-2009, 09:34 PM
The grinds on the VIN C 3800 Cams & the VIN N 3300 cams are very similar, so they should be interchangeable. Here's the OEM part numbers.

1989-1990 (3300) 12338326
1989-1990 (3800) 12338325 & 12339315
1991-1993 (3300) 24501457 & 25535546
1991-1993 (3800) 25536869 & 24501458 & 24503401

Buick_powa
10-28-2009, 11:59 PM
hummm i was wondering if... the 79-96 odd-fire (I KNOW our engine are even-fire) 231 CID BUICK cam would fit in a 3300...

like those ones...

http://www.compperformancegroupstores.com/store/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=CC&Category_Code=67-CAM

or on the even fire side:
http://www.compperformancegroupstores.com/store/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=CC&Category_Code=69-CAM

just wondering (images are for reference only on the website)

CamoDeafie
10-29-2009, 12:04 AM
probably not. you'd be surprised at the differences between the various 3.8s made....

Jr's3800
10-29-2009, 03:51 AM
You are right... as well they have a distributor drive gear and a fuel pump lobe...

TonyBuick
10-30-2009, 09:23 PM
your best bet would be to either take your old one out or buy a new one and take it to a machine shop to get a new one made. same goes with the pistons and crank. For how tough these motors are im really suprised at the lack of internal performance modifications. but then again when you got the legendary 3800 in your line up why would buick care about any other motor.... = ( The after market has labeled these a-bodies as granny cars so its a real pain to get much of anything

jhill98
11-08-2009, 06:39 PM
the 3300 and 3800 are definitely Buick engines. These are the beginning of a line of engines that would be 'on-center' engines. The previous engines the 3.8L and 3.0L that have been in the A-Body cars are also Buick engines, but these are considered 'off-center' engines very similar to the Buick Grand National engines and all the older V6 engines back to 1961. All Buick V6 engines from 1977 1/2 to 2008 are 'even-fire' engines meaning they fire at an even interval, all of the older common pin engines are call 'odd-fire' and are outside of the scope of this forum.

There are other GM 90-degree V6 engines, the 3.3L 200-CID, the 3.8L 229-CID, and the 4.3L 262-CID engines. Just to be clear these three engines are Chevrolet engines and no parts are common between these and the aforementioned Buick 90-degree.

The biggest difference between the 3300 and 3800 V6 engines is the 3300 has a 1" shorter deck height (centerline of crankshaft to head gasket surface of the block) This makes the engine just a little more compact and mainly able to fit in the N-body cars, but did help with room on the A-body cars.

1989-1992 3300 cylinder heads are the same casting as the 3800 "C" engine heads. 1993 3300 engines received a new cylinder head which was the same casting used on the 1993-up 3800 Series I engines.

If you have the 1993-up cylinder heads on your engine, you can use a set of 1.8:1 roller rockers to give yourself a boost. I know they sell a set of these at ZZ Performance and at Intense Racing for $369 a little pricey but you don't have to tear your engine apart very far to give yourself a bit more lift with should help flow a bit more air.

I'm working on a one-piece seal block, and still collecting parts and comparing things between the Series I and Series II.

Century7667
11-09-2009, 02:32 AM
the 3300 and 3800 are definitely Buick engines. These are the beginning of a line of engines that would be 'on-center' engines. The previous engines the 3.8L and 3.0L that have been in the A-Body cars are also Buick engines, but these are considered 'off-center' engines very similar to the Buick Grand National engines and all the older V6 engines back to 1961.

Could you elaborate a bit on 'on-center' vs. 'off-center' engines? I rebuilt a '77 odd fire once, so I'm a bit familliar with the engine. Nothing recent though.

Thanks,
Ken T.

Jr's3800
11-09-2009, 03:15 AM
Anyone correct me if I am wrong...

On the Odd fire engine 2 rods shared the same journal, This made for an inherent vibration.. Almost in the way a Harley idles and vibrates( at least the older ones )...

In the later 3.8 engine( even fire ) they went to a split pin crankshaft.. Being that they did this it caused the bores to be off center in relation to the piston/rod due to the new location of the crank journal... So in these the bores were not perfectly centered in relation to the rod/piston assembly... In some cases the motor would beat its self up... But I have seen too many of them exceed 200K... Most didn't get too far past 250K... To the best of my knowledge the split pin crank was the difference between the odd fire and even fire...

In the 3800 V6( Vin C 1988 ) this was corrected and the bores were now on center.. There was a lot of new technology that went into the 88 3800 making it a very clean emissions friendly, as well it was the lowest friction engine of the time..

LordDurock
11-09-2009, 03:43 AM
i just though of something. are the 3800 cams more or less the same? what i mean is if the cam blanks are the same. check on the cost of a custom cam grind. with the modded specs of a blueprinted 3300 cam
and i fell like post this
http://img166.imageshack.us/img166/2301/vorteccams6ct6.jpg

the other option is to find a local mecian shop and have them cut you cam blank on a lathe, and harden it, and then the blank to the cam shop and have the grind it your specs

Zaloryan
11-09-2009, 05:27 AM
Buick used two completely different cams in the 3300. The first one that was used in 1989 and '90 engines came with a flange that measured 2.960". It had a dowel pin and three threaded holes for the cam gear. The flanges on most of these cams were .418" thick, but there were a few thin ones that measured .387" that were installed along with a special .032" shim to keep the timing chain properly aligned.

The cams with the thin flange can be visually identified by the knurl on the outside diameter of the flange itself (see photo on page 48). Cam movement was controlled with a spring-loaded cam button that was held in place by the front cover.

A new cam that had a snout instead of a flange was introduced in 1991. It used a keyway to locate the cam gear and had one big, threaded hole in the center of the cam for the bolt that held the cam gear on. A circular thrust plate with three holes was bolted to the front of the block to keep the cam in place.

Both the early and late cams used in the 3300s had slightly different specs than the ones that were used in the corresponding 3800s, but the grinds are similar so most rebuilders use them interchangeably.


So, as far as I can tell is that a 1990 3800 cam will work in a 1990 3300. And a 1991 3800 cam will work in a 1991 3300.

jhill98
11-09-2009, 06:19 AM
The previous post is correct odd-fire were 3 crank throws with 2 rods sharing one journal just like a V8 does. In 1977 1/2 model year Buick split the pins 30 degrees giving the current even firing setup. Since the move in 1977 to the split pin crank, the cylinder bores were still lined up as they were with the common pin odd fire crank. This made the connecting rods off-centered in pistons because of the material in the split part of the crank. When they moved to the 3800 "C" engine and beyond they moved the banks to center the rods in the pistons. On-Center.

Much of the reliability issues with the old 3.8L off-center engines stemmed from the nice nylon geared timing set that GM used with this engine. My old '80 Monza bit the dust at 156k and upon pulling it apart the oil sump screen was plugged with nylon shavings from all those mileage wear, and in the oil pump, and in the first main bearing that is right off the pump.

I haven't added a Series II engine into my pile of parts yet, but one of the rebuilding notes state that the 3800 and 3300 Series I cams are interchangeable. One caveat here is that you cannot use a Series II/III cam in a Series I engine because of the heads have the ports in a different order.

Series II/III heads are symmetrical with the layout of I E I E I E and the Series I and older heads are I E E I I E. This doesn't mean that the blank won't fit and you can grind a Series I grind onto it.

I do know everyone is focused on the cam, but with 1.8:1 rockers, and you probably could install larger valves in this engine than the 1.71" and 1.41", all of which wouldn't be reinventing the wheel as the rockers are bolt on, and the valves any machine shop can cut new seats and you can grind out the bowls to fit them. Most valves can be ordered to spec without much cost difference. Basically this is one of the things that GM did on the Series II engines. To go from 170hp to 205hp how much was the 1.8" intake and 1.5" exhaust valve, and how much was the cam? As well as port design. I can't say that dog leg of a front exhaust manifold is anything but restrictive on the 3300.

Zaloryan
11-09-2009, 03:28 PM
I can't say that dog leg of a front exhaust manifold is anything but restrictive on the 3300.

How so? The rear exhaust manifold is more restrictive.

jhill98
11-10-2009, 02:18 AM
There are two things that will hurt airflow.

#1. Sharp Bends
#2. Sudden Expansions

The front manifold has the first 2 pipes move down out of the head and into the 'log' and then the log bends up to meet the third port. This third port is at a complete 90 degree angle to the 'log' which means all the flow hits the outside wall and is forced along by the flow of the other 2 pulses. This was most likely the best solution the designers had for installing the engine into our cars as the cooling fan is in the way, at least on the N-body it is right there with no room to spare. The A-body just received the same part. I do think there is more room in that compartment, i'm new to this chassis as I've had J-N-L-body cars for the last 20 years. Starting with my 1987 Z24 and ending with a 1990 Skylark Gran Sport with a 3300 in it.

The rear manifold doesn't nearly have this kind of kink in the system.

Neither is an optimum solution, but the front manifold is the one that in my eye got the compromised design by far more than the rear manifold.

Jeff

Century7667
11-10-2009, 02:52 AM
Much of the reliability issues with the old 3.8L off-center engines stemmed from the nice nylon geared timing set that GM used with this engine. My old '80 Monza bit the dust at 156k and upon pulling it apart the oil sump screen was plugged with nylon shavings from all those mileage wear, and in the oil pump, and in the first main bearing that is right off the pump.



My 231 odd-fire had just 126,000 when I tore it down for overhaul. It was well cared for by a single own, but had drivability issues. Upon disassembly, the only thing that was wrong with it was...as you mentioned the timing chain. The sprockets were metal on mine, but the timing chain stretch was so bad that the engine ran awful. I suppose the odd fire cam was quite rough on it. I spec'd a cloyes double roller for it, but the machine shop screwed me and stuck me with an 'Elgin' set (non-double roller). I did cam it up with a Comp Cams 252H (mild street/RV cam), 3 angle valve job, and chevy 327 valve springs. Unfortunately, that chain only lasted 80,000 miles. But that motor sure ran well, and it ran hard! The engine did idle smoother than you might image, especially back in those days. If you wanted a shaker, the early 80's Chevy V6's were old-fire too, and they could really shake. By the time Chevy got to market with their 90 degree V6, Buick already had the even fire worked out. I just don't know when they got their 4.3 to even fire. I know the first 4.3 wasn't...I watched on in the engine bay of a 1985 Chevy at the dealer...laughing because I had a smooth as silk 4.1 inline six...I didn't laugh for long though, the 4.3 would dust my 4.1 easily.

Ken T.

jhill98
11-29-2009, 01:40 AM
one thing that is different about Series 2 cams besides the lobe profiles, is that the cam bearings on the Series 2 cams are larger.

3300-3800 Series I cams have 1.785" journal diameter.
3800 Series II/III cams have 1.825" journal diameter.

if Series II cam blanks are available and fit in every other way when the journals are turned down to the 1.785" diameter, these could be used to grind custom cams profiles for our engines.

Also I do not know if this enlarging of the journals was done to allow taller lifts, i do not know at this time the stock 3300/3800 lift and base circle to tell how close to the 1.785" journal diameter the peak of the lobe gets.

Drop Top Olds
11-30-2009, 12:14 AM
Being an Olds v-8 guy.... Just because there are no cams offered off the shelf from a supplier... that doesn't mean "not available". I would have a custom cam ground for your needs. It will cost more but it will be based on what you want out of the motor. Think of it as buying a custom tailored suit instead of "off the rack"......

I plan on using a custom grind for my 350R (hydraulic roller cam) when it is time to rebuild.

Midnight Drifter
02-05-2010, 07:09 AM
3300 and 3800 engine ARE chevy engines buick only made V8 and one V6 the 3.8 from the grand national the rest come from chevy

How Dare you insult the Fireball V6 like that.

Century7667
02-05-2010, 11:24 PM
How Dare you insult the Fireball V6 like that.

Yep. Buick was making V6's 17 years before Chevy did their first one in 1978 (200 CID 90 degree that grew to the 229)

Ken T.

Prospeeder
02-05-2010, 11:39 PM
I know i hate that when people talk like they invented it or somthing when its clearly wrong what there saying, lol.