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Headliner repair, impossible?

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  • Moonkilla1
    replied
    Originally posted by a1veedubber View Post
    Looks very good to me! I have done a few myself and it is always satisfying once done. Something that probably everyone who owns an older vehicles will need to do at some time, that foam degrades over time no matter what.

    Also, add me to the list of people who like the idea with the leftover material, I might do the very same thing the next time I do one, did you notice any signifigant noise reduction/interior heat change?
    Thanks for the complement A1

    To my surprise, YES it made a big difference with interior heat reduction. I can literally feel the spot I didn’t add the foam to with my hands and its much warmer. On a hot day I could remember wanting to open all the doors to let that heat out and now no matter how hot and swampy it gets over here I can just sit right down without that thought.

    I also think this will lead to my board and new fabric lasting a lot longer now that the direct heat from the sun is off of it.

    As far as the noise goes it does seem a lot quieter in the car but I changed my muffler and pipe around the same time I did the headliner. Rusty sounded crazy with all the holes in the old pipe. I do expect that it does help though.

    Thanks,
    Carlos

    Leave a comment:


  • a1veedubber
    replied
    Looks very good to me! I have done a few myself and it is always satisfying once done. Something that probably everyone who owns an older vehicles will need to do at some time, that foam degrades over time no matter what.

    Also, add me to the list of people who like the idea with the leftover material, I might do the very same thing the next time I do one, did you notice any signifigant noise reduction/interior heat change?

    Leave a comment:


  • Century7667
    replied
    Thank YOU for another nice write up on the headliner. There are a good number of them on the site, and together anyone should be able to do it.

    I know I need to myself, since my headliner is sagging. I like your idea of extra insulation. We get just as much radiant heat here in Houston!

    Ken T.

    Leave a comment:


  • Moonkilla1
    replied
    WOW thanks for all the positive feedback guys!

    I can’t lie it’s a tad wavy in a few spots but its super hard to peel the bad layers of fiber glass off and keep it perfect. I don’t mind it one bit though. I did it not only so it looks better but mostly because it can get so hot in the car.

    Before this project there was nasty heat coming in from all the edges of the board and it made the car feel like AC wasn’t working because our heads were stuck in a heat cloud. Now my wife is lowering the AC because it gets too cold in the hottest part of the day. The board itself would leave round orange circle on my head if I bumped it, or left orange on my clothes if I brushed it reaching for something in the back. Thank goodness those days are over!

    Some of you may know Florida is already in the high 80’s with the “feels like” in the high 90’s so I’m sure glad I put in the time to get this done.

    The extra insulation is paying off in huge way. The only spot I didn’t cover with the scrap fabric is the ONLY spot you can feel that’s warm to the touch, the rest of that board is cool even when its super-hot out.

    The inferred tint on the windshield has played a major role in keeping my wife and 2 year old girl nice and cool. No more burning seat belt buckles, steering wheel or baby’s car seat. Also even with the sun coming straight in the car I still just feel the warmness of the sun but not the hot. I used to feel my arms and thighs burning going down the road now I don’t even notice it at all. Its super clear ceramic 2 ply IR tint and its definitely a game changer if you’re trying to keep your car from getting to 140 degrees or higher in the parking lot at the salvage yard.

    Thanks again guys!

    Leave a comment:


  • CieraSL92
    replied
    Looks fantastic!

    Leave a comment:


  • turbokinetic
    replied
    It looks very good! Not many would notice the small imperfections. Also, that was a good idea to save the leftover material for insulation!

    When Chris (AVTechMan) came to Alabama, we did similar repair to Camilla; his Eurosport Coupe. I had never done one before and was not confident - but it turned out very well!

    Leave a comment:


  • Drop Top Olds
    replied
    looks good. I have to do mine too. I got ticked off and trimmed all the floppy fabric off. Now I look at that brown piece of foam. Once I recover more I will have to take this project on too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Peoria Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Moonkilla1 View Post
    Through my research I found that if the board was not evenly cleaned or peeled you would see the imperfections through fabric.
    True that! Its one lesson I learned the hard way.

    My headliner board had a lot of cracks, dents and other imperfections. Like a lot of people do, I brushed on a coat of fiberglass gel to help strengthen the bad spots, and I used some fiber cloth to patch a few spots. I tried to smooth it a little but in my naivete I assumed the foam-backed headliner fabric would cover up most anything.

    I was wrong! I could see every imperfection through the new fabric. No matter though, it was a good learning experience. I searched (for a year!) for a new, better board and did the job a second time. This time, any repairs I had to make were carefully smoothed. Turned out 100% better.

    Glad yours came out good! That's one project that goes a long way to bringing back the "new car" ambiance.

    Leave a comment:


  • PGuru
    replied
    Wow, awesome job! Thanks for adding pictures too!

    Leave a comment:


  • 85_Ciera_Rebuild
    replied
    RE: "Well I gave it my best shot, it wasn’t perfect"

    Few people would notice; it looks good enough...thx for tidbits.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ray_McAvoy
    replied
    Looks great!! Nice job!

    That's a clever idea using the left over material as extra insulation on the roof!

    LOL on the itchy hands ... just reading about it is making me itch

    You're right, getting the old glue & foam residue off the backer board without digging too deep into the soft fiberglass is a rather tricky part of the job. Looks like yours came out pretty smooth though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Moonkilla1
    started a topic Headliner repair, impossible?

    Headliner repair, impossible?

    Before starting the project you should know that all I had over my head was the board and no map light. all quotes from local business ranged from $150-$240 to do the job. When I took it in to have it done the owner keep the car for 6 hours only to call and say the board was too old and could not be removed from the car without breaking it… I was turned away.

    The board was horrible and the glue from the previous fabric was dry and would crumble to the touch. It was in bad shape do to the heat and failing gaskets around the doors

    I was able to replace the gaskets that caused water to get in the car some time ago. This headliner repair has been on my list of things to do. I went on YouTube and made myself very familiar with how the repair is done. I ordered the fabric and high temp adhesive costing me very little.

    I was ready to get started on this new adventure with the hopes of finishing with a victory; or at least my board in one piece as I did not have a backup on hand. I am missing quite a few pictures of what was done but I will fill in the blanks

    first I removed all plastic starting from the center of the board and out to the edges. To my surprise after it was all removed it still hung there. The board was being held by 5 Velcro strips (3 in the back and 2 in the front). As I lowered the board it caused a mess of debris from the dried glue and fiber glass so I put on a painting mask and made quick work of the puzzle to get it out from the passenger side door. I ran in the house to let the wife know it was in one piece, she was excited to say the least. My wife has been asking for this headliner to get done for a long time now.

    I brought the board over to the side of the house and started to peal the first few layers of fiberglass off the board. It was hard like a cracker on top and soft underneath those layers I was removing. I tried my best to get it as even as possible. Through my research I found that if the board was not evenly cleaned or peeled you would see the imperfections through fabric. Well I gave it my best shot, it wasn’t perfect, but I was happy. Just a side note; use gloves when doing this. 10 minutes in I was regretting not covering up properly and my hands were VERY itchy.

    After I was done my next step was to start the adhesion from fabric to board. I laid the fabric over the whole board to make sure I had a few inches or more of fabric exceeding the board on all sides.

    Once I could confirm a good fit and proper placement I folded the fabric back on to itself enough to reveal half the board and half of the underside of the fabric . now it was time to marry the two. The headliner adhesive spray must become tacky before the two come together and you have about 60-120 seconds before it’s too late.

    I set the spray to high flow and moved fast to cover every inch on that board and every inch on the underside of the fabric. I gave it a touch to be sure it was tacky and began to flip the fabric back on to the board making sure not to stretch the material as I went. I ran an open hand over every inch to make sure the newlyweds would have a shot at something that would last.

    now the other half went the same way; I flipped over the fabric till I could see the adhesive from first half. I repeated the steps and married the fabric and board. I then let this sit and had some dinner.

    Upon return I flipped the board upside down and with a razor cut off any excess fabric outside of an inch or two around the whole board. You definitely want to flip the board so you can see clearly how close your cuts are to the edges of the board. From here you can spray adhesive and fold over your 2” of fabric to the underside of the board.

    now that this is done take your razor and make sure you make a cut for your dome light and where any screw needs to go. This is best to do when the board is upside down and you can easily see all the openings on the board.

    I took all of my left over fabric and used it as another layer of insulation between the board and steel. This was just a thought that came to mind so I figured why not, I am so glad I did this



    I then put the board back in the car the same way it came out. The covenant Velcro made it easy to get it back together. I stuck the board in place and reinstalled all plastic trim and visors vacuumed the car really well; made my wife proud. I had to order the dome light plastic online which I put in yesterday. It’s finally complete and looks good if I can say so myself.











    According to the company who turned down this job this was an impossible task, I’m glad they thought so; it saved me a lot of money.
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