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Thread: Rear shocks and towing/hauling

  1. #16
    Senior Member Duke George V's Avatar
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    That was last year, but it was going to be a turbocharged 1987 Pontiac 6000 SE wagon. It's currently owned by a user here named turbosewgn. He doesn't post here anymore, sadly. I'm pretty interested in knowing if he ever got all the little things sorted out on it.



  2. #17
    Senior Member Duke George V's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duke George V View Post
    I'm gonna revive this, since I might be doing some hauling soon. I'm looking at Monroe Sensa-Trac shocks for the rear, part number 58427. They have a 25 lb spring over them, and say they're made for vans that are used to tow or haul. Anyone have any experience with that particular shock?
    No one knows anything about this? I'm mostly wondering if these shocks will negatively affect ride quality.

  3. #18
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    Default Don't shock yourself

    I have a century wagon w/3rd-row seat, and haul 2 kids back there all the time. I have Gabriel Ultra shocks, and put airlift 1000 bags in the rear coil springs. The bags made a HUGE difference! better handling, stability, and a firm ride without being harsh.The kit comes with 2 air fill valves, and I put separate fills for the bags because I didn't want any side to side transfer of air.
    I recently warrantied out my front gabriel ultra struts for some that fit a '94-96 dustbuster. The spring seat is 3/4" higher, and I now run 225/50-17s on steel wheels front and rear. I really wanted to go with Monroe struts, but the spring seat didn't have much difference. The monroe load-adjusting shocks, and the max-air shocks have 7.25" of travel...way more than any gabriel. SD Truck springs has some air-suspension bags for $28-$40 that you could replace your rear springs completely with. Good Luck!
    Last edited by JB1; 02-11-2012 at 11:47 PM.

  4. #19
    Senior Member Duke George V's Avatar
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    I bought those Monroe shocks I linked to in a previous post and installed them today. Easy job, as long as you have a helper. Of course I forgot to take pictures. The van rides a lot better now, especially since the old shocks were more or less blown and old as hell. Ride height is a bit higher in the back as well. Should work real well for when I move next.

  5. #20
    Senior Member white89euro's Avatar
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    Hello!

    My experience in towing has been with
    1. A-body wagons (including a tech4)
    2. Windstar Minivans
    3. Venture / Montana Minivans

    By FAR the best for towing were the Venture / Montana vans. They tow (and have towed) our 2500 pop up camper with ease. You really cannot tell anything is behind you. Plenty of power to spare and gas mileage around 16.5 highway.

    I agree with the other posters: what ever you two with, install a transmission cooler first.
    Second, I have always used Gabriel or Monroe air shocks (added to the vans and wagons). This keeps your headlights aimed correctly and keeps your van/trailer from scraping the pavement, especially on driveways for gas stations.

    I tow only in drive, never overdrive - saves the transmission.

    That's all I can think of...
    George

  6. #21
    Senior Member Duke George V's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by white89euro View Post
    I tow only in drive, never overdrive - saves the transmission.
    Not only that, at 60-65 mph, the gearing puts the engine right in the meat of the torque band, at least on my 3.06 and Buick V6.

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  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by white89euro View Post
    Hello!

    My experience in towing has been with
    1. A-body wagons (including a tech4)
    2. Windstar Minivans
    3. Venture / Montana Minivans

    By FAR the best for towing were the Venture / Montana vans. They tow (and have towed) our 2500 pop up camper with ease. You really cannot tell anything is behind you. Plenty of power to spare and gas mileage around 16.5 highway.

    I agree with the other posters: what ever you two with, install a transmission cooler first.
    Second, I have always used Gabriel or Monroe air shocks (added to the vans and wagons). This keeps your headlights aimed correctly and keeps your van/trailer from scraping the pavement, especially on driveways for gas stations.

    I tow only in drive, never overdrive - saves the transmission.

    That's all I can think of...
    George
    One of the reasons that the Montana could tow so well was the 3.29 gearing behind the 3400, and in the later years with the 3500 there was more torque to be had, pretty good for a 3.5 pushrod...

    The old Trans Sport with the 3800 and 3.06 gears could tow as well... The 90-96 vans weighed 3600-3800 Lbs and with the torque of the 3800 towing was easy.. Bad part is there is no class III hitch for the 90-96 vans.. IIRC the 3800 powered vans were actually rated to tow 3000 Lbs.. And 94-96 Vans had some updates that the earlier ones didn't have, Frame also changed to some degree...

    I also agree on the cooler... If you tow or are going to tow a Trans cooler is a must...

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