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Thread: Air Conditioner Repair Videos - Full System Restoration...

  1. #31
    Senior Member CorvairGeek's Avatar
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    Ups the idle in low speed maneuvers when the switch opens (input to the ECM) on higher steering assist pressure. Old and less sophisticated control system.
    Last edited by CorvairGeek; 04-12-2016 at 01:41 AM.
    Jerry



  2. #32
    Senior Member Century7667's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CorvairGeek View Post
    Ups the idle in low speed maneuvers when the switch closes (input to the ECM) on higher steering assist pressure. Old and less sophisticated control system.
    Thanks Jerry! Makes perfect sense to me, I just had no idea at the moment. I just assumed the ECM would sense the load on the motor and compensate that way.

    I can recall my older cars from the 70's that might die at low speed in the parking lot turning the steering wheel.

    Thanks!
    Ken T.

  3. #33
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    I changed my post after I thought about it, as it actually opens on higher pressure. Unplugging the switch will shut down the A/C all together, IIRC.
    Jerry

  4. #34
    Senior Member turbokinetic's Avatar
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    The purpose of that switch on this era of cars is to prevent the combined load of the compressor and P/S from pulling the engine RPM too low, to an area where it is out of the certified emissions compliant range. Some of the later cars had this switch going to the ECM and the ECM would increase the idle air control to help prevent this effect.

  5. #35
    Senior Member Century7667's Avatar
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    Make sense. I might have to look at the 1996 wiring diagram to see where that car would fall since it is OBD2. May fall into the latter category.

    Ken T.

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    I don't believe the '96 3100 uses one.
    Jerry

  7. #37
    Senior Member Century7667's Avatar
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    Where would it be located? On the rack? I know there wasn't anything near the pump.

    Ken T.

  8. #38
    Senior Member CorvairGeek's Avatar
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    On a power steering line, near the rack on the passenger's side (at least on a 3300).
    Jerry

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    Newbie/first-time poster here with some questions on orifice tubes & a/c compressors for Oldsmobile Cutlass Cieras.

    1.) Anyone care to weigh in on whether or not VOT's (variable orifice tubes) were ever used in any Cieras (up to '93) with the 3300 engine? In either virgin OEM or serviced/overhauled R-12 systems? I read that these cars used Harrison HR6 a/c compressors. BTW, what's the difference between HR6 & HR6-HE?

    2.) Same question about orifice tubes for the '94 and up cars with 3100 engines using R-134a refrigerant. Apparently these models used V5 a/c compressors. On tap is my opportunity to check out a "grandmom" '96 car, but I won't be able to inspect it for a while yet on account of the owner being away. I don't know what kind of orifice tube is in the a/c system currently, but would the VIN tip me off to the OEM original?

    3.) Can V5 compressors be used in '93 & earlier Cieras in place of OEM HR6 compressors without incurring compatibility issues that require major tweaking or work-arounds?

    4.) Anyone have real-life experience with VOT's and thus feel that they're a superior choice over fixed tubes? Or are the touted benefits negligible and over-hyped? Each type seems to have its advocates and detractors.

    5.) If any, what are the differences between OEM GM-numbered a/c compressors and their ACDelco-numbered equivalents?

  10. #40
    Senior Member Century7667's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 93CieraDude View Post
    Newbie/first-time poster here with some questions on orifice tubes & a/c compressors for Oldsmobile Cutlass Cieras.

    1.) Anyone care to weigh in on whether or not VOT's (variable orifice tubes) were ever used in any Cieras (up to '93) with the 3300 engine? In either virgin OEM or serviced/overhauled R-12 systems? I read that these cars used Harrison HR6 a/c compressors. BTW, what's the difference between HR6 & HR6-HE?

    2.) Same question about orifice tubes for the '94 and up cars with 3100 engines using R-134a refrigerant. Apparently these models used V5 a/c compressors. On tap is my opportunity to check out a "grandmom" '96 car, but I won't be able to inspect it for a while yet on account of the owner being away. I don't know what kind of orifice tube is in the a/c system currently, but would the VIN tip me off to the OEM original?

    3.) Can V5 compressors be used in '93 & earlier Cieras in place of OEM HR6 compressors without incurring compatibility issues that require major tweaking or work-arounds?

    4.) Anyone have real-life experience with VOT's and thus feel that they're a superior choice over fixed tubes? Or are the touted benefits negligible and over-hyped? Each type seems to have its advocates and detractors.

    5.) If any, what are the differences between OEM GM-numbered a/c compressors and their ACDelco-numbered equivalents?
    I'm not familiar with the term "variable orifice tube." I do know that the V5 compressors were "variable displacement" depending on load, and those systems used a standard cap tube / orifice tube at the condenser. Perhaps you are referring to the "expansion valve" systems.

    Can you put a V5 on the earlier cars? The V5 came with many mounting options, but I suspect the challenge may be in the hoses, but not being familiar with the HR6 compressors, I don't dare speculate.

    I've got 3 V5 systems in service now, and I have found them to be quite reliable and perform well. I especially like the fact that they do not cycle, a big plus on small motors. Maybe this is what you referring to as VOT.

    I don't believe GM vs. Delco numbers are an issue, but I understand that Chinese manufactured units are to be avoided, and rebuilt or new American compressors from GM are preferred. That's from David, the author of the video; he's done many systems!

    Ken T.

  11. #41
    Senior Member CorvairGeek's Avatar
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    Sources I respect have nothing good to say about the variable orifice tube because they are prone to breaking.
    Jerry

  12. #42
    Senior Member Century7667's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CorvairGeek View Post
    Sources I respect have nothing good to say about the variable orifice tube because they are prone to breaking.
    Where they used on the a-body cars?

    Ken T.

  13. #43
    Senior Member turbokinetic's Avatar
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    Hi there. I can answer a few of your questions!

    Quote Originally Posted by 93CieraDude View Post
    Newbie/first-time poster here with some questions on orifice tubes & a/c compressors for Oldsmobile Cutlass Cieras.
    I don't believe the factory ever used a variable orifice in any of the A-cars. I have used them. About 6 or 7 years ago, when those were first seen in the aftermarket around here, they were good. I would use the 4-Seasons VOV brand and had great success. They were made in USA. Then; the stores began selling a Chinese knock-off under the same brand and part number. These don't seem to perform the same. Now, I don't use them unless I have an older USA-made one.

    The 3300 does have an HR6 compressor. Not sure what's the difference with the -HE model.

    I have adapted V5 compressors to many different engines. The LG3 3.8 and the LN3 3800 can use a V5 but there are some minor modifications to the brackets. The compressor requires spacers on the bolts to get the pulley alignment correct. Furthermore, the holes require a slight (about 1/8") slotting to accept the wider width of the compressor. The rear bracket (tail support) also requires modification to reach the tail support bolt hole on the V5.

    In the end - it is very much worth it. To agree with Ken; the lack of cycling (which you CAN feel, even with a big engine) is a great thing. Also, it seems the V5 cools better at low engine speeds and around-town driving. On the freeway they all work about the same.

    As far as I know there is NO difference in the OEM and ACDelco compressors. The parts distribution system is different for factory production and parts sales; so the numbering is different. I don't believe the units are internally different.

    Hope this helps!
    Sincerely,
    David

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  14. #44
    Senior Member CorvairGeek's Avatar
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    Interesting, but not surprising, the variable orifice tubes went to crap when the production went off shore. I was only aware of them being aftermarket.

    I love the V5 myself. The HR6 cycling is very noticeable on our 3300. It cools fantastic and is very quiet (was new from a GM dealer along with a lousy refrigerant conversion) but the load with a proper R134a is significant.
    Jerry

  15. #45
    Senior Member turbokinetic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CorvairGeek View Post
    Interesting, but not surprising, the variable orifice tubes went to crap when the production went off shore. I was only aware of them being aftermarket.

    I love the V5 myself. The HR6 cycling is very noticeable on our 3300. It cools fantastic and is very quiet (was new from a GM dealer along with a lousy refrigerant conversion) but the load with a proper R134a is significant.
    Yeah it's a shame about the quality problems. My 84 Olympia has an original USA variable orifice and it works like a charm. The "new / Chinese" V5 compressor I installed at that same time failed 3 times. The store gave me a replacement orifice tube, but it was Chinese. Hard lesson troubleshooting the system. Ended up locating the original one, cleaning it, and putting it back in. Problem solved. But the Chinese compressors were a continued fail. I got fed up with it and installed the cheapest reman from Advance that they sold at the time. It is still there several years later and still cools like a champ!

    I have been thoroughly impressed with HFC152A. Although it does require a conversion and flush (oil compatibility) it seems to perform about as well as R12. The cycling clutch surge is less, too since it runs at a lower pressure. It helped My 87 Park Avenue which has an original DA6 cycling compressor. Even with the mighty 3.8SFI LG3 engine you can feel the clutch cycle. With the HFC152A it is less noticeable.

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