Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 40

Thread: '95 Century FWD Refresh

  1. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Chicago, Illinois
    Vehicle
    1993 Buick Century 3300 V6
    Posts
    462

    Default

    Oh yeah baby, I can't wait to put a sport rack on mine. Just one more of the many projects to be done.



  2. #17
    Senior Member Duke George V's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Lost Wages
    Vehicle
    1996 Buick Century wagon, 1992 Buick Century sedan, 1993 Buick Century wagon
    Posts
    2,387

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Century7667 View Post
    ...I view this as a good training for when I do the BIG project on the '96: Dropping the entire cradle for transaxle removal.
    Any reason you don't want to pull the whole drivetrain out the top? After having the drivetrain out of my car twice, I've found that to be the "easier" way. Undo wiring, mounts, hoses, pop the axles out of the trans, out the top with a crane. It's a lot simpler to rejoin engine and transmission when you have full access to all sides outside the engine bay, and you don't have to buy a special tool to hang the engine (or figure out another way).

  3. #18
    Senior Member Century7667's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sugar Land, TX
    Vehicle
    1996 Buick Century Limited 3100 V6 / 1995 Buick Century Special 3100 V6 / 2001 Chevy S-10 LS 2.2L
    Posts
    3,793

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Duke George V View Post
    Any reason you don't want to pull the whole drivetrain out the top? After having the drivetrain out of my car twice, I've found that to be the "easier" way. Undo wiring, mounts, hoses, pop the axles out of the trans, out the top with a crane. It's a lot simpler to rejoin engine and transmission when you have full access to all sides outside the engine bay, and you don't have to buy a special tool to hang the engine (or figure out another way).
    I'm still considering it. I don't like working under the car (I'm getting old and without a lift it really sucks). I still have to pull the axles though, so that's one negative going out the top. On the other hand, pulling the entire assembly gives me access to parts of the engine I might not otherwise have access as well as the wiring harness which needs attention. I am finding that the working looms and flexible conduit are shot.

    Ken T.

  4. #19
    Senior Member Century7667's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sugar Land, TX
    Vehicle
    1996 Buick Century Limited 3100 V6 / 1995 Buick Century Special 3100 V6 / 2001 Chevy S-10 LS 2.2L
    Posts
    3,793

    Default

    So, another day at work, and a little time with the Century when I get home. Today I spent most of my time clearing off the floor around the front of the car, so that I can get up under the radiator core support area to work on those trans lines.

    Up top... The clamps take a 1/4" nut driver; one of the few SAE fasteners on the car! Note the cooling fan is removed giving me good access in here.



    ...and Below:



    These came off pretty easily. I just slit the lines with a single edge razor blade and got up under the rubber. They bled a little, but I put each one in a plastic drinking water bottle.

    I also cleaned around the fittings on the trans. The flare nut fittings take a 16mm wrench....which I do not have. So, tomorrow I'll procure one of those and continue the project!

    Ken T.

  5. #20
    Senior Member CorvairGeek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    The Gem State
    Vehicle
    1992 Century Special 1996 Century Custom
    Posts
    577

    Default

    I see you have a power steering cooler 'clamp' with the bottom sheared off too. I've had to collect some extra of these myself, since the wife has an obsession for seeing how close she can get to concrete curbs. I'm sure she'll mash / puncture the cooler one of these day.
    Jerry

  6. #21
    Senior Member Century7667's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sugar Land, TX
    Vehicle
    1996 Buick Century Limited 3100 V6 / 1995 Buick Century Special 3100 V6 / 2001 Chevy S-10 LS 2.2L
    Posts
    3,793

    Default

    I didn't catch that! I need to take a closer look when I get home tonight! It's all on me. The car is slow low I scrape every curb!

    Ken T.

  7. #22
    Senior Member Century7667's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sugar Land, TX
    Vehicle
    1996 Buick Century Limited 3100 V6 / 1995 Buick Century Special 3100 V6 / 2001 Chevy S-10 LS 2.2L
    Posts
    3,793

    Default

    Been chugging away at it. The new lines are installed:



    I kept thinking, man these AC Delco lines are too short. They don't fit very well. Then I looked at my '96, and realized the trans is raised 3 inches in the air! Lost a ton of trans fluid during this operation; well over pint. For the whole project, I suspect I am down a good quart.

    I mentioned in 93CieraDude's thread my battery tray is gone; a view from the bottom:



    I've been toying with the idea of a trunk mounted battery...but I really love my trunk! From below, it look like something can be done, but I really haven't looked that closely yet. I don't weld, so that limits my options. :-(

    Today, (in a few minutes I'll be starting...) I plan on installing the trans mounts. Great fun I am sure. I'll just put on some good music and take my time. Every project has a music theme, for this project, I did the Beach Boys progressing through albums chronologically ( Pet Sounds, Smiley Smile, Wild Honey, 20/20, and now Sunflower & Surf's Up). For the LIM project I did Asia's studio albums (quite a few actually). Music helps the project...especially when you are at that point where you are just staring at whatever it is wondering how you are going to do whatever you are going to do! Keeps the curse jar empty too, since you are humming a tune rather than saying words like F$$%, S45t, and B!it6h.

    Ken T.

  8. #23
    Senior Member Century7667's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sugar Land, TX
    Vehicle
    1996 Buick Century Limited 3100 V6 / 1995 Buick Century Special 3100 V6 / 2001 Chevy S-10 LS 2.2L
    Posts
    3,793

    Default

    It took 5 hours, but I got the front and rear trans mounts installed. This is a real exercise in patience.

    REAR MOUNT -

    The rear mount should be first, and if you follow SegaGT's guide, you'll be in good shape. I did take some off the stud on the rear mount (coming out of the rubber), but almost took too much. All the bolts did have locktite, but the nuts are locking nuts. The locking threads are the last few threads, so you need to make sure there's enough stud left to engage them. In my case, I shortened that stud, but left the mount to cradle studs alone, there were already 1/8" shorter than stock. I was able to, with some negotiation, get the mount in behind the trans, and then the bracket. I then assembled the two parts loosely with the 15mm nut.

    Mount only:



    Together:



    I installed and tightened the bracket to trans bolts using a ratcheting 13mm wrench with final tightening with this Williams boxed end offset wrench (Highly Recommened! Love this wrench):



    FRONT MOUNT -

    I didn't expect much trouble with the front mount, but it was a challenge. The transaxle assembly "floats" in the engine bay supported by block of wood and jack, a worn out engine mout, and whatever else that's hanging on to it all (exhaust system). Consequently, it's hard to control the rotation, height, and azimuth to get the holes to line up...even with the the frame to mount bolts loose. I did torque the single 15mm nut onto the mount:



    I just didn't see a way to assemble the bracket and mount like I did on the rear while up in the car; this had to be done on the bench...the nut is a horrible angle, and to be honest, the rear nut and stud isn't in a great position either. The transmission line bracket was a real problem further complicating getting the bolts started. Patience. Patience. Patience. :happy sad:

    Eventually I got it in:



    From there I started tightening all the fasteners: 1st Trans Case Fasteners, 2nd Mount to Cradle Fasteners, and then finally the 15mm nut that joins the rear trans bracket to rear mount. That one is very difficult to get to. I had a 15mm 1/4" socket that was to be delivered to the house today, but it didn't arrive until 6:45 p.m. I hit the showers at 6 p.m. So, this is what I did, I used my SK 3/8" ratchet with fine teeth....and did a CLICK, PUSH, CLICK, PUSH, CLICK, PUSH,....... I really had to push the handle back into the steering rack boot to get that "click" sometimes. This made for some tired fingers, but eventually I got to the bottom, and torqued it the best I could. Tomorrow I will try the new 1/4" 15mm socket. I may get some better feel with the additional freedom, not sure how much torque I can apply to the quarter drive. All my quarter drive ratchets are Asian.

    So, the mounts are done. I am not wondering what to do next. Probably the lower ball joint, then the strut....and then finally the CV shaft!

    Ken T.
    Last edited by Century7667; 04-22-2017 at 02:00 AM.

  9. #24
    Senior Member Keiths1976's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Florida
    Vehicle
    1995 buick century custom
    Posts
    1,156

    Default

    Great job Ken

  10. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Chicago, Illinois
    Vehicle
    1993 Buick Century 3300 V6
    Posts
    462

    Default

    Wow! Awesome Ken.

  11. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    110

    Default

    5 hours! Ugh! But you got 'er done. Kudos to you!

  12. #27
    Senior Member Century7667's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sugar Land, TX
    Vehicle
    1996 Buick Century Limited 3100 V6 / 1995 Buick Century Special 3100 V6 / 2001 Chevy S-10 LS 2.2L
    Posts
    3,793

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 93CieraDude View Post
    5 hours! Ugh! But you got 'er done. Kudos to you!
    Well, to be honest there was some overhead. For example spending 45 minutes trying to locate two bolts only to discover that they were screwed into the transmission case holding the transmission line bracket in place for the transmission line install. I spent some of the time sweeping the floor and cleaning things up before things get too chaotic. I don't have a professional mechanic background (my day job is systems administration), but I do have a mechanical background (father, grandfather). Not being paid by the hour, I work at my own pace. I really hate to do things twice, so I tend to be meticulous and plodding (listening to music, thinking, moving along... ) I really prefer to have things worked out in my head rather than working by the seat of my pants! I've become more so as I've gotten older.

    ..and the body is sore from rolling around on the ground yesterday. Forearms especially.

    Ken T.

  13. #28
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Enteprise, AL
    Vehicle
    1991 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera 3300 V6
    Posts
    31

    Default

    I'm about to change the my car's trans lines too, as they're dry rotted. At the same time, I plan to change my car's transmission fluid. I don't know if its ever been changed, I know it hasn't in the nearly 20 years that the cars been in my family, but it isn't burnt. It is however clear and I'm sure it's well past its useful life. The cars transmission shifts fine, but the shifting can be harsh. It's certainly not as smooth as it used to be. I know the car calls for Dexron II, which as in the case of Dexron III, is no longer available. Do you know what replacement fluid should I use for the car? I've heard about the horror stories when changing the fluid on a vehicle that hasn't had regular changes, so if anyone has tips/warnings I should to be wary of, I'm all ears. Also, I know there's a difference between a change and a flush. I'm planning to drop the pan and change the filter and fluid, and I've read about some nasty results from a flush, as it would seem that they're often done incorrectly, so I'm a tad bit apprehensive about going that route. Also about how many quarts of fluid can one expect to replace when performing a change vs flush. Thanks in advance.

  14. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    110

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Century7667 View Post
    I don't have a professional mechanic background (my day job is systems administration). Not being paid by the hour, I work at my own pace. I really hate to do things twice, so I tend to be meticulous and plodding. I really prefer to have things worked out in my head rather than working by the seat of my pants! I've become more so as I've gotten older.

    ..and the body is sore from rolling around on the ground yesterday. Forearms especially.

    Ken T.
    Gee, except for systems administration and paternal background, that describes me to a T - especially your last comment. I live in Aspirin City, 'cause when working on cars, (especially old ones), no pain = no gain!

  15. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    110

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Whistler5.1 View Post
    I'm about to change the my car's trans lines too, as they're dry rotted. At the same time, I plan to change my car's transmission fluid. I don't know if its ever been changed, I know it hasn't in the nearly 20 years that the cars been in my family, but it isn't burnt. It is however clear and I'm sure it's well past its useful life. The cars transmission shifts fine, but the shifting can be harsh. It's certainly not as smooth as it used to be. I know the car calls for Dexron II, which as in the case of Dexron III, is no longer available. Do you know what replacement fluid should I use for the car? I've heard about the horror stories when changing the fluid on a vehicle that hasn't had regular changes, so if anyone has tips/warnings I should to be wary of, I'm all ears. Also, I know there's a difference between a change and a flush. I'm planning to drop the pan and change the filter and fluid, and I've read about some nasty results from a flush, as it would seem that they're often done incorrectly, so I'm a tad bit apprehensive about going that route. Also about how many quarts of fluid can one expect to replace when performing a change vs flush. Thanks in advance.
    I recently did what you're about to. See the more recent entries in my '93 Ciera makeover project thread. I opted not to go the commercial shop-style flush route with a machine as I was afraid of stirring up trouble with old ATF that had probably never been changed. I only did a pan drop & drain, then refilled with fresh fluid after cleaning the pan & magnet and replacing the filter. I did some research on backward compatibility with Dexron-II and chose to refill with Valvoline Dex-Merc. I think I used about a gallon. Castrol also makes a comparable product.

    I'm going to let the tranny run with this refill for a while, then maybe try a "home-made" flush later. Since I've already dropped and cleaned the tranny pan and know that a fair amount of old ATF remained in the torque converter, I'm intrigued by the idea of disconnecting the radiator oil cooler outflow line and running the transmission pump momentarily AT IDLE to collect 1 quart or so of ATF. Then add one quart fresh ATF and repeat until satisfied that most of the fluid is new. The idea is to let the transmission pump gently do the flushing for you. I have experimented with this type of technique in smaller amounts when flushing old power steering fluid in another vehicle and it worked out fine. It helps to have another family member or buddy at the wheel to shut the car off when the target amount of fluid is captured in whatever catch container is being used.

    I used this glass jug as my catch container during the power steering fluid change because the color and condition of fluid within the glass can be clearly seen and evaluated. Just have to be careful not to break the glass.



    If I go the home-made flush route in the future, I will attempt to fabricate an adapter by cutting and flaring a short stub of appropriately-sized metal transmission line with a fitting/nut over it to thread into the radiator oil cooler outflow port. Same procedure as cutting and flaring a brake line. That way I can clamp a hose on the adapter to direct into my catch jug the fluid outflow pushed by the transmission pump.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •